TIME-STAMPED PHOTONS

TYPE

DATE

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DATASET[S]

LOCATION[S]

SURVEY METHOD

SPONSORS

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OUTPUT[S]

LIDAR SCANNING | DATA VISUALISATION |
2016 – 2021

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POINT-CLOUD RADIOMETRIC DATA

OLD COLLEGE COURTYARD EDINBURGH
GEORGE IV BRIDGE EDINBURGH
NATIONAL LIBRARY OF SCOTLAND EDINBURGH
ST CECILIA CONCERT HALL EDINBURGH
DALTON SCRAPYARD EDINBURGH
GEORGE SQUARE
ST NICHOLAS STREET

TERRESTRIAL LIDAR

EDINBURGH FUTURES INSTITUTE 
CREATIVE INFORMATICS 
NATIONAL LIBRARY OF SCOTLAND 
CENTR FOR DATA CULTURE & SOCIETY
DATA-DRIVEN INNOVATION
UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH

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POINT-CLOUD DIGITAL MODELS 
HIGH-RES DATA VISUALISATIONS [7,680 x 4,320]
DIGITAL ANIMATIONS [4K]
​​

Light Detection and Ranging scanning is the remote-sensing of a target phenomenon through time-stamped propagation and backscattering of pulsed signals. It measures territories (airborne and terrestrial surfaces) at light speed into forensic-grade radiometric and topographic datasets called point-clouds––territories whose temporal location is irretrievable (à la thermodynamic asymmetry). Measurement, according to oft-cited statistical studies, is a pre and post-interaction signal sequence––temporalising atemporalities. Light, since the primordial ‘deflagration’ in non-existence, is a speed––a measurement done in time.

 

The point-cloud is a chronometric archive, encapsulating pulverised and disarticulated temporalities. During scanning, a photon interacts and attenuates across the tellurian medium, exposing spatiotemporal and physicochemical characteristics through backscattered echoes. Consider a photon travelling a distance d backscattered from an object; delayed through the phase φ as the difference between the reference and measured signals in proportion to the distance traversed; c as the light speed; f as the modulated frequency of the reference signal––then distant d is obtained in terms of phase φ and f as:
   
       d=c•φ (1)/ 2f 2π
       
The point-cloud, as such, is collapsed time of flight echoes, stored as chronometric invariants in a local three-dimensional coordinate system (x-axis, y-axis, z-axis)––out of which, algorithms can interpolate models and extrapolate images, indexing the physicochemical characteristics of scanned territories. On a molecular level, the morpho-chemical properties of an object induce anisotropic effects in a pulsed photon; it polarises its backscattering orientation. In consequence, a random percentage of the emitted photons never returns to the scanning apparatus. Such scattered photons constitute data outliers. Outlier points are measurement errors, often unorganised, appearing sparse, sometimes clustered and randomised in the local point-cloud saturation––inducing numeric and topographic aberrations in the geometrical features of scanned objects. 

 

This series is a product of long-durational terrestrial scanning conducted across different locations in Edinburgh, Scotland. Each point-cloud model is a negentropic fossil, stabilising ravages of entropic becoming in molecular topoi, while transfixing protean environments replete with airborne and surface outliers, in a mathematical quarantine. Each image is an indexical substantiation––an autoradiograph, sampling the extinction coefficient of pulsed photons into precision-based (+ – 0.1 mm) topographic artefacts. The point-clouded world, when thawed through algorithms, is a suspended 'disaster', amputated from its stellar irradiance (dis- ‘cut’ and astrum ‘star’)––over-exposed through a non-pyranometeric light from within, contra without. Human bodies, once quantised, like all else in the world, are caught in a temporal void, like gyrating outliers amidst indexical spores. 

 
 

A  OLD COLLEG COURTYARD, UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH_

B  GEORGE IV BRIDGE

c  NATIONAL LIBRARY OF SCOTLAND

D  DALTON SCRAPYARD

E GEORGE SQUARE EDINBURGH FRINGE

E  CENTRE FOR RESEARCH COLLECTIONS, UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH